Orchard Open Day 2018

The Community Orchard Open Day, organised by the Friends of Bourne Wood, was thoroughly enjoyed by those who came, and despite the weather forecast we had a sunny time!  There was live music from Dean Hardy and Friends  who play regularly at the Masons, Bourne and the Hare & Hounds at Haconby.  They played two sets of lively music – a  mix of Irish, Folk, Country and traditional tunes.  People could either sit and listen, or wander and enjoy the ambiance of the orchard – and the children managed a little dance!

There were plenty of delicious cakes from the homemade cake stall, with teas and coffees to wash them down.

pond at bourne orchard
Despite the weather forecast we had a sunny time!

Children had craft activities to try, and a guess the fruit competition as well as traditional games, which adults also enjoyed, and became quite competitive.  These were supplemented by a craft stall, second hand book-stall, and a plant stall. The Bourne Wood booklet was also available.

The Friends had picked some fruit from the orchard, both to show people the different types of apples and pears, but also so people could take some away with them for a small donation.  There will be more punnets available for the next few weeks during opening hours in the orchard, on a Saturday and Sunday, 10am to 6pm.

pears
The Friends had picked some fruit from the orchard, both to show people the different types of apples and pears, but also so people could take some away with them for a small donation.

A huge ‘Thank You’ goes to Dean Hardy and the other musicians for their entertainment and to all our other volunteers who helped set up and look after the stalls on the day.  The event was supported by PPL PRS Charity and Community Discount Scheme.  PPL PRS licences the use of copyright music across the UK, giving businesses and organisations the permission they need to play the music they want.

The Friends next event is a Fungi Foray on Sunday October 21st, at 2pm in the main car park.

Photographs by Steve Goddard

Children’s Activity Afternoon 2018

We had a lovely sunny and warm day for the Friends of Bourne Woods first children’s activity event in the Bourne Community Orchard on Saturday.

There were plenty of activities for children to try their hands at – painting butterflies which could fly in the wind, making caterpillars, building their own bug hotel to take home, and a treasure hunt around the orchard.  Taking part in the treasure hunt gave the children a chance to win a copy of ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’ book by Eric Carle.

children making butterflies
Making butterflies!

There was also the chance to relax in the orchard with some homemade cake and a hot or cold drink.

The children had great fun – making lots of noise, running around looking for clues and making a sticky mess!  The event also helped raise awareness of the existence of the orchard, the need for volunteers to help tend it and funds to maintain it.

gathering information
The event also helped raise awareness of the existence of the orchard, the need for volunteers to help tend it and funds to maintain it.

Thank you to all that helped on the day both setting up and during the afternoon.

Photographs Roland Smith

Wassail Bourne Community Orchard 2018

The Friends of Bourne Wood held their second Wassail in the community orchard in Bourne on Saturday in conjunction with Bourne Borderers Morris.  A Wassail is a traditional custom to celebrate the apple harvest of last year, to reawaken the trees, and to encourage them to bear fruit this year.  The rain had cleared by the time the event started at 4.30pm and a crowd of around 80 people had gathered to join in the celebration.  Richard Jefferson welcomed everyone to the event, and then Bourne Borderers commenced the proceedings with a traditional Morris dance.  Those attending were then offered a taste of either mulled cider or apple juice and some cake, before everyone sung the ‘Apple Tree Wassail’.

wassail queen leads the parade
The gathering then proceeded into the orchard, led by Emily, the Wassail Queen, the way being lit with lots of candles.

The gathering then proceeded into the orchard, led by Emily, the Wassail Queen, the way being lit with lots of candles.  The trees were blessed with cider, and toast was placed in the branches for the robins, by anyone wishing to take part, while Vaughan Roberts played his violin.   The trees were wassailed, with the customary poem, followed by lots of noise, with everyone present banging pots and pans, and cheering!

Once back on the hard-standing the Borderers danced again, and all joined in the ‘Here we come a wassailing’.  The evening ended with the Mummers play.

bourne borders dance
The Bourne Borderers danced again, and all joined in the ‘Here we come a wassailing’.

The Friends would like to thank everyone for supporting this event, and especially Bourne Borderers for their help and support, and all those who provided cakes and helped out on the day.

Photographs thanks to Steve Goddard.

Orchard Open Day & Friends Birthday Party 2017

The Community Orchard Open Day, organised by the Friends of Bourne Wood, was well attended and thoroughly enjoyed by those who came.  There was live music from Bourne Folk Club, who play regularly at the Masons, Bourne and Wishing Well, Dyke.  They played two sets of lively music – a  mix of Irish, Folk, Country and traditional tunes.  People could either sit and listen, or wander and enjoy the ambiance of the orchard – or even dance as some were doing!

bourne folk club
Bourne Folk Club played two sets of lively music – a mix of Irish, Folk, Country and traditional tunes.

At lunch time the committee cut the cake celebrating 20 years of the Friends group, and this was shared amongst the helpers, with any excess supplementing the delicious cakes from the cake stall.  Teas and coffees were available to wash them down.

cutting cake
At lunch time the committee cut the cake celebrating 20 years of the Friends of Bourne Wood.

Children could try their hands at pebble painting or picture colouring, and while waiting for these to dry were able to play some traditional games, which adults also enjoyed. There were also craft stalls and a plant stall.

craft stalls
There were also craft stalls and a plant stall.

The Friends had picked some fruit from the orchard, both to show people the different types of apples and pears, but also so people could take some away with them for a small donation.  The Bourne Wood booklet was available

pond people walking
People wandered and enjoyed the ambiance of the orchard

A huge ‘Thank You’ goes to Dean Hardy and the other musicians for their entertainment and to all our other volunteers who helped set up and look after the stalls on the day.

Photographs Steve Goddard  and Richard Jefferson.

 

Fruits of the Forest Walk 2017

Around 25 people enjoyed a sunny Sunday afternoon walk looking at the fruits and nuts produced by trees, shrubs and plants within the wood.

people on the fruits and nuts walk
Around 25 people enjoyed a sunny Sunday afternoon walk looking at the fruits and nuts produced by trees, shrubs and plants within the wood.

The first shrub was an elderberry, with mention of using the fruit for jellies and syrup, and also the flowers for cordial, this was followed by a search for mast under the beech trees.  Continuing we studied the dogwood, which has its cultivated cousin in many gardens, larch trees with their cones, and the common blackberry or bramble – which apparently has numerous varieties.

blackthorn berries for sloe gin
The blackthorn which produces the fruit sought after by so many to make sloe gin.

We moved on to look at blackthorn which produces the fruit sought after by so many to make sloe gin, oak trees searching for the many types of gall and hawthorn with its brightly coloured berries so attractive to birds.  Various other species were discussed as we continued our way, including yew, guelder rose, rowan and crab apple.

crab apples
Beautify blue sky, and numerous crab apples.

On the way back we stopped to look at the wild service trees (which the group has as its emblem), these trees were planted on boundaries, have lovely white flowers in the spring and berries which can be made into jellies, although being brown in colour, are not very attractive or appetising!

Photographs by Steve Goddard

Creating A Wildlife Pond

The Friends of Bourne Wood have been in the process of creating a wildlife pond in the Community Orchard for several months.

This has now become a reality thanks to support from Bakkavor with a couple of work parties.  The pond was started in November 2016, after the liner was donated by the Forestry Commission,  but adverse weather stopped play, so finally last week it was completely dug, with the liner fitted and filled with water.

digging-out-the-wildlife-pond
Everyone seemed to have great fun digging the pond! Photograph Tracy London

Everyone seemed to have great fun digging the pond, and it has been great to see it completed and full of water.

There is still plenty to do, with plants still to be inserted, and the area made secure.

Those visiting at the weekends can see the project develop further, and hopefully enjoy the wildlife attracted when completed.  The orchard is open on Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays 10am to 6pm (dusk in winter).  There is a work party every Saturday morning from 10am to 12pm, for general maintenance of the orchard – which anyone is welcome to join.

volunteers-wildlife-pond
The Friends would like to give a huge thank you to Bakkavor, and to all the volunteers! Photograph Tracy London

The Friends would like to give a huge thank you to Bakkavor, and to the individuals – Carla Collick, Tracy London, Anna Moffitt, John Gomez, Nicole London, Richard Thorold, Shannon Hasbury and
Jennie Beasley, and to Cindy and Mick Curtis for managing the project.

SKDC Local Plan

The consultation document from SKDC for the Local Plan for the next 20 years, contains two allocations of housing which could affect Bourne Wood in the future:

One area is off Cedar Drive and although access is allocated to be off Cedar Drive – who knows what will happen in the future. Additionally it is a greenfield site, a very wet field, and brings housing closer to the wood reducing the green belt around the wood (at the moment this is a grass field with cattle).

There is also an allocation off Beaufort Drive – again this will mean an increase of traffic – access is not defined – so could this encourage ‘a relief road’ and brings housing ever closer to the wood – and it is a greenfield site.

Its important people read and understand the contents of the consultation document, because this is the future of Bourne and its surrounds. Helen Powell is organising a meeting next Wednesday July 19th to discuss the plan – at 8.30pm at the Abbey Church Hall – all welcome – which may give you a better idea about the consultation form! The consolation document can be view here.

Your support is important, thank you!

Easter Trail 2017

The Friends had a successful Easter Trail on Easter Monday.  Children followed a bug trail, answering questions related to the beasties placed around one of the rides.  This was followed by a dinosaur quiz, which the children knew the answers to – while the parents struggled!  Over 60 children participated in the event, accompanied by their parents and grandparents.  Everyone seemed to enjoy the good weather, and the test of their observation skills and insect knowledge.

stall with people
Everyone enjoyed the trail and the Three Counties Dog Rescue and the Friends stalls.

Three Counties Dog Rescue had a stall and tombola, and were showing off one of their rescue dogs.  The Friends provided drinks and there were plants for sale.  The Friends were also selling their new booklet ‘Bourne Wood – A  portrayal of a wood in Kesteven’ which can also be obtained at their next event – a Plant Stall in the Community Orchard, off Beech Avenue, Bourne on Saturday May 27th from 10am to 12pm.

Thank you to everyone who helped out at the event.

Wassail Bourne Community Orchard 2017

The Friends of Bourne Wood held their first Wassail in the community orchard in Bourne on Saturday in conjunction with Bourne Borderers Morris.  A Wassail is a traditional custom to celebrate the apple harvest and reawaken the trees.  The event started at 4.30pm, just as it was becoming dusk with Bourne Borderers dancing.  The crowd that had gathered were then offered a taste of either mulled cider or apple juice and some cake, before everyone sung the ‘Apple Tree Wassail’.

The gathering then proceeded into the orchard, the way being lit with lots of natural lights.  The trees were blessed with cider, and toast was placed in the branches for the robins, by anyone wishing to take part.  The Wassail Queen Emily sang a beautiful solo and the trees were wassailed, followed by lots of noise, with everyone present banging pots and pans, and cheering!

crowd at wassailing ob bourne community orchard
The Wassail Queen Emily sang a beautiful solo and the trees were wassailed, followed by lots of noise, with everyone present banging pots and pans, and cheering! Photographs by Steve Goddard

Once back on the hard-standing the Borderers danced again, Emily sang a further lovely song, and all joined in the ‘Here we come a wassailing’.

“Our Wassail, jolly Wassail, joy come to our jolly Wassail. How well they may bloom, how well they may bear, so we may have apples and cider next year”

“Hat-fulls, cap-fulls, three bushel bag-fulls, little heaps under the stairs. Hip, hip… Hooray!”

The evening ended with the Mummers play, and thanks to all for their attendance and help.

The Friends would like to especially thank Bourne Borderers for their help and support with this new event.

Fungi Foray 2016

The enduring appeal of mushrooms and toadstools ensured that around 30 people turned out for the fungi foray in Bourne Woods in late October. Dr Vin Fleming gave a brief introductory talk on fungi before we set off into the woods armed with our various collecting baskets and containers.

An hour or so later the group had amassed a diverse collection of different types and Vin set about trying to identify what the group had picked.

golden spindles fungi
One of the stranger species was the Golden Spindles which we found in grassland near the car park.

One of the stranger species was the golden spindles which we found in grassland near the car park while arguably the most unusual coloured species was the lilac toadstool known as the amethyst deceiver.

blushing bracket fungi
Blushing Bracket fungi.

Other types we found included the common puff ball (edible when young!), shaggy ink cap, sulphur tuft (a poisonous species), trouping funnel cap, blushing bracket, honey fungus, and the ochre brittlegill, the latter so-called due to its dull yellow cap.

collection of fungi
Although it may seem rather destructive, small-scale collecting of fungi is not detrimental to maintaining populations of the various fungi.

Although it may seem rather destructive, small-scale collecting of fungi is not detrimental to maintaining populations of the various fungi. Mushrooms and toadstools are just the fruiting bodies of the fungus and the bulk of a fungus is underground forming a vast web of branching threads known as the mycelium. Of course, more caution would be required with very rare species of fungi or where fungi are being collected commercially.